Too Big And Intense: One Brickell May Need To Be Redesigned After Neighbor Complains

One Brickell’s approval by the city’s Planning Department is being appealed by a neighbor.

A lawyer representing 500 Brickell’s condo association filed the appeal last month. In a letter, he wrote that that the project is “too big and intense” for the property on which it is proposed at 444 Brickell Avenue.

As part of the approval, the Planning Department granted a waiver that would permit two of the towers to be built closer together than it is permitted by the Miami 21 zoning code. That, along with two other waivers, is being challenged by the 500 Brickell association.

The city’s Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board is scheduled to review the appeal at a meeting later this week. If the board grants the appeal, developers Related Group and GTIS Partners could be forced to redesign the project.

Arquitectonica is the project architect. Related Group and Arquitectonica also were the developer and architect at 500 Brickell.

 

 

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Anonymous

Being ‘too intense’….hehehe….it’s better to say the truth, they’re hurt because this project will block their views

Anonymous

I’m sorry but this is nonsense. Brickell Heights 1 & 2, Solitair, Rise, Reach and SLS Lux are going to be just as close together if not closer. And that’s with 830 Brickell and The Burger King lot still undeveloped. 500 Brickell just doesn’t want to lose their views…or at least delay it from happening.

Anonymous

Disagree,sour grapes,this is the ground zero,build as tall and dense as possible.

Anonymous

Agree if this is going to be a world class city it needs to be large intense and structurally magnificent. If builders listened to every little complaint nothing would ever get built. Get over it !!! MIAMI IS GROWING LARGE RIGHT NOW- BUILD BUILD BUILD. I want Miami to be the envy of the country and the world.

Marc305

As a business owner of a Realty Company in Brickell I love skyscrapers, but I disagree that every street in Brickell should be as dense as possible. The location where this project happens to be is right in front of a bridge and one of the most congested area in Downtown Miami. This issue has to be addressed both by the city and the developers wanting to add more construction around it first. Creating extreme density in an area already overwhelmed by problems is both negligent and irresponsible.

Anonymous

Confucius say – Never buy Miami condo next door to empty lot.

Anonymous

This is not an empty lot.

marc

I’d actually would prefer 2 towers with the same parking/retail pedestal and taking it to the maximum height allowable at that lot.

Anonymous

I’d prefer without the parking pedestal.

marc

Well yeah, but that will never happen in a building of this bulk.

Anonymous

What ugly looking buildings… how can any developer be happy in building this type of crap. Same old Related delivering same type of nasty Arquitectonica cheap products.

Anonymous

Well, it’s not like what’s there now is winning any architectural awards.

Anonymous

What a stupid statement. If what’s there is ugly building something attractive, not another version of ugly.

Anonymous

Check out this person’s vernacular:

“If what’s there is ugly building something attractive, not another version of ugly.”

And this person calls someone else’s statement “stupid?”

Anonymous

Good thing they don’t really care about what you think.

Will

What impresses me about this design is the height of the three towers vs. the height of the parking podium. Compare to the icon across the street whose podium takes up a much larger % of the building height.

Anonymous

Ok, let related build one tower that’s 1200ft tall then…problem solved.

Anonymous

We live in a dense populated city, more people moving here every day, you don’t have a right to views, and building taller help preserve open space, this just another lawyer trying to extort money from a developer, it’s not a humanitarian effort.

Danny

It isn’t money really. This goes on everywhere, people complain about lost views. They will have a much stronger voice due to the waivers. This happens all the time. Not entirely fair but lesson is try to avoid waivers and variances.

Anonymous

It’s not the bulk it’s the design. It’s the same old cheap Arquitectonica painted stucco and glass. Miami needs to up the standards and use better cladding materials if it’s ever going to be a world class city. We can’t keep building 70 story painted back yard CBS storage sheds! Use some great materials and inspiring architecture and people will be less likely to complain!

Anonymous

There’s plenty of “inspiring” architecture going up this cycle…sorry that every single building isn’t up to your lofty standards, but it takes a sea of Hondas to let Ferraris stand out.

Also, not sure what kind of materials you want. Concrete’s been pretty prevalent for a long while. Steel’s pretty much the only other option and has its own drawbacks. And then again, if every building were steel, then you’d tire of that and demand concrete. (Actually, that recently happened in Toronto’s market.)

Anonymous

Really? Where is all this “inspiring” architecture? Look at the towers being built in NY, London, and yeah Toronto…very few Miami buildings can compete with them. The Four Seasons is an example of what we should be aiming for. I don’t think we want a “sea” of bad architecture to make a few buildings stand out.

Anonymous

Is this really a free country????
Wow, so you own a piece of land, a property and you can’t do whatever you want on that property because of your neighbors interest on your property? Interesting…

Anonymous

That’s the way this commenter who comes on here named Danny feels. Danny (and a few other posters) want the FlatIron site developed into what they think it should be. They could care less how much money Mr Colombo has spent so far on HIS property.

Danny

I am all for what zoning approves. It is a struggle but I build what was approved to me. I respect the process and rules. I don’t get one design approved then begin preconstruction sales on a completely new design that has not been approved, then complain to the City to demand the new design approval because I am already knee deep. He foresaw sales slowing down and wanted to lock as many possible before waiting approvals. It is a risk he and his team took voluntarily.

I am sorry that you don’t see it for what it is. But that is okay, because we have a process and a set rules which Ugo will go thru just like everyone else.

Anonymous

Where is it written in stone that when you buy a peice of property you must build what the previous owner’s architects designed to put there?

Stop making up your own scenarios and rules, Danny.

Anonymous

I thought Cesar Pelli was the architect :oops:.

Anonymous

Hey, don’t beat yourself up over it, anyone could make that mistake.

Anonymous

My main issue with this development is that two of the three towers are single loaded corridor. This prime, central, and prominent downtown location is definitely NOT the place for that type of building style. There are plenty of city views to be had in all directions when smack in the middle of the urban core. The last thing we need is more emergency corridors/lights in our skyline, especially right in the hear of the city. Single loaded buildings grow like weeds in Miami, and the city really needs alter the code to address these types of buildings before it is too late.

Anonymous

Um yeah, sure, and if they keep altering codes for people like you, they’ll be doing nothing after that but altering the altered codes.

Anonymous

i agree, the new buildings should respect the current zoning limits,

Danny

Unless there happens to be a hardship.