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Two 50-Story Towers Planned At Downtown Macy's Site

Two 50-Story Towers Planned At Downtown Macy’s Site

Downtown Miami’s Macy’s property will be getting two new towers, the owner told Miami Today.

The two buildings are planned to rise 50 and 55 stories. They would include hotel, office and residential, with retail at the base.

Construction is hoped to begin within three years.

David Braka, vice president of property owner Aetna Realty, said that while there are plans to keep and renovate the original building, most architects and engineers are pushing for it to be replaced. Demolishing and replacing would allow the new building to be customized to tenants, although there aren’t any problems with the old building.

Aetna has already been contacted by several retail companies, he said.

 

historic view of the store:

(above photo via phillip pessar)

today:

interior today:

(bottom three photos: phillip pessar)

 

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Anonymous
Anonymous

aww man, when Burdines was still around.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It is such a shame Macy’s ruined the buildings, the facade, and just about everything about this property from the beautiful buildings they once were.

They went from anchoring retail in downtown to being a complete disaster.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I was just there last month for their “Great Close Out Sale” I found some socks that were listed 3 for $20, I take them to the register and she says that will be $25 bucks, I show her the tag and she says that does not apply, since they are closing she has to charge me individually for each and then give me the discount, which comes to 5 dollars more. I ask to see the manager and she says that she is the manager. I just put the socks down and left. On the way out of there were so many homeless people it was crazy. That didn’t really bother me but the smell of urine was too much for my friends. I am personally glad Macy’s is gone and I hope they tear it down completely. It is time for something better to be built in its place.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Tearing down a building just because its tenant gave you crappy service is the dumbest reason ever. It’s not the building’s fault poor management turned it to shit. The complex has so much potential for historic restoration and adaptive reuse into lofts or a boutique hotel for the original section facing 1st Street, and conversion into an urban Target and other big box store for the annex facing Flagler Street. For example, look at the former Carson Pirie Scott department store on State Street in Chicago, presently called the “Sullivan Center.”

Anonymous
Anonymous

Did you not read the part about the homeless people and the smell of urine? Do you think restoration will fix that?? My job was located next to Macy’s and it was horrible. I was glad to be out of there. This building needs to be torn down and the streets need to be cleaned up!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yes the streets need to be cleaned up, but tearing down the building for something else won’t magically repel homeless people. With that logic, San Francisco would be as clean as a Japanese hospital, except it’s full of homeless people. There’s even GIS maps for concentrations of fecal matter.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I was in San Francisco last week, stayed in the Marina district near Chestnut St and the area was clean.
Walked a lot and saw no poop or pea on the sidewalks like one can see in the area west of Union Square.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It’s terrible, along Market Street for God’s sake. City officials are so twisted in the mind, they believe it’s part and parcel of the “charm” living in San Fransicko.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I am not sure how old you are, but I am old enough to remember the Omni area back in the 80’s and 90’s. It was filled with not only homeless people but prostitutes as well. Nocking down old buildings and replacing them with new ones DID solve the problem and it does so in most cities (I guess San Francisco is the exception). This project may take a while to build but rest assured it will happen.

Anonymous
Anonymous

For Omni, they just torn EVERYTHING down, and only now are they building on the empty lots. Would you do that for Downtown? Absolutely not. Even Detroit hasn’t been that erratic, and some beautiful historic gems have been restored, and utilized better than any hypothetical new replacement building could.

The point is, tearing down this historic structure would be another mistake and missed opportunity, and would do little to address the big picture of Downtown’s homeless problem. What about the vacant space along NE 1st Street and SE 1st Streets? What about all the 7-Elevens and CVS’s selling cheap beer and wine? What about the fact Mana is letting every other property rot and attract homeless instead of utilizing space with better tenants, demanding better police patrol to discourage homeless congregation and encourage foot traffic to actually be successful? You’re putting the cart before the horse.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I am all for saving historic jewels, the Olympia Theater comes to mind, but Macy’s? Seriously?? Tear this crap down, Downtown deserves better!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Downtown indeed deserves better, like restoring the original facade reflective of our history which has long been forgotten. Plenty of crappy nondescript low-rise assemblages should be torn down before ever considering destroying something like this, especially blocks further east within shadows of skyscrapers built over thirty years ago.

Anonymous
Anonymous

What history is that? That Burdines stood there once?? People like you would like to keep EVERYTHING that is over 50 years old, but that is simply not going to happen. Developers are the ones with the money and they are the ones who make the decisions, and thankfully they don’t think like you.

Debbie Wang
Debbie Wang

What’s wrong with the smell of urine?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Urine is supposed to be one of the most offensive smells to humans. It’s evolutionary biology, like how cats mark their territory with piss, and why it smells so bad.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I like having guys piss on me. *shrug* So sue me.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Homeless people are everywhere downtown. You’d have to tear down 30 buildings if you wanted to tear down every one they hang out in front of. And they can just as easily come back to a new building.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This ain’t Yelp dude. Chill…

TheTruth
TheTruth

Thank you.

Please don’t yell
Please don’t yell

I was about to say the same thing…..

Anonymous
Anonymous

Great post.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Three Years = Six Years

Miami
Miami

if not more!

Miami
Miami

i’m sure our GREAT city government will do something to delay it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Flagler is too important to continue rotting away like it is, but 3 years seems like an understatement unfortunately as the current cycle seems to be winding down. I’m hoping this gets don faster and Mana starts doing something…anything!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Why is Flagler St ‘too important’?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Center of the city, duhhh!

Miami
Miami

I guess you don’t know the history of the city. Flagler is a staple of the city.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Understandably, city centers shift over time, by market forces and/or government urban renewal blunders. Flagler Street undeniably needs and will see redevelopment, from Worldcenter and MiamiCentral adding pressure to what Brickell already exerts, and hopefully it can be done in a way that restores and effectively utilizes historic resources while building tall and substantial. The last thing we need is another Centro, Kobi Krap courthouse replacement, or slumlord Mana spending spree.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“…most architects and engineers are pushing for it to be replaced”

Of course, so they can build apartments and/or condos with the crappiest architecture and context by Arquitectonica, Stantec, or Sieger Sairez. Restore the original section of the department store into upscale lofts, and convent the Flagler Street side to a Target.

Anonymous
Anonymous

*convert*

Anonymous
Anonymous

Even the crappiest design of the Melos or Arquitectonica would be an improvement over this decrepit old building.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Unless Zaha Hadid comes back from the dead and is commissioned for a new condo tower on this site, nothing is an improvement over a historically restored building so significant to Miami and South Florida as a whole’s commercial past, while adapted for a twenty-first century use.

Magazine
Magazine

You understand that you are free to purchase this piece of property and develop it as you see fit, correct?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Tear it DOWN!!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

THIS IS MIAMI BABY, SO TEAR EVERYTHING DOWN! IT DOESN’T MATTER THE CONSEQUENCES, BECAUSE WE WILL DEAL WITH IT TOMORROW!

Anonymous
Anonymous

that building did not age well at all lmao

Anonymous
Anonymous

When I see the original beauty of all these old buildings,I am not sure there was any progress at all in the last 70 years. Seems quite the opposite had happened. Everything is getting crappier and crappier.

Anonymous
Anonymous

FYI, the “historic view of the store” is Miami Avenue and SE 1st Street, not Flagler. The facade was destroyed with a blank wall around the 1950s or 1960s, and has a tacky mural with killer whales. It’s the original W.M. Burdine department store, with Flagler Street frontage being additions and why the escalators are in different places.

Here’s a 1930s postcard before the entire corner was bought for additions, as well as the original Lincoln Road branch:
http://floridaverve.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/burdines-postcard.jpg

Miami
Miami

FYI, they are not killer whales.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Google Whaling Walls. It is an honor to have that mural in Downtown Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Except it’s faded and peeling, and unless it can be restored elsewhere, say Wynwood, it will be extinct if the building is torn down or restored.

SRS
SRS

I studied above Macy’s when FIU had the Downtown MBA in that building; it was like 8 years ago. I remember since then, the store was struggling with the homeless problem. They talked to the city officials many times and i have to say they never addressed the issue. A lot can happen with this site since it has a tremendous potential, but the city and the DDA must act now in cleaning downtown and relocating the homeless to shelters.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I lived in downtown in The Capital Lofts where the new Wework spaces are now open. I dealt with Homeless people, urine smell, etc… BUT GOD, I MISS the feeling of living in a city. The Biggest problem in Miami is our local leaders’ Babyboomer Suburban Mentality. Downtown Miami is still 90% occupied by commercial and offices buildings, once they close at 5-6 PM the area become a ghost-town until next day. I’m pretty sure that none of the DDA boards members live even close to the downtown area, I’m really surprised their plan to improve the area contemplates demolish Dupont Building to build a new Walmart’s shopping plaza.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Can you provide the source of the demolition of the Dupont building.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Restore it back to the original architectural form and sell the high-rise development rights to a developer. The building would enhance a vibrant downtown. The building could be used as a tax free development for a museum or used as a casino or a library or a school.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You had me till the casino part. NO CASINOS IN MIAMI!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Neither of those uses are feasible. We need something paying tax to clean up the streets.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Casinos only enrich the owners of casinos unless you also trust Miami’s government to tax and use the funds appropriately…good luck with that! Casinos ultimately take money from poor people trying to get rich fast, which puts more pressure on local government services. Miami absolutely does not need a casino.

Anonymous
Anonymous

One of the last nuclear fallout shelters open to the public.

Flymia
Flymia

Is this owner a developer?

If not he will just spend some money on basic plans maybe get some approvals to upsell the property. I say at least 5-7 years until anything is built, if in that amount of time.

Anonymous
Anonymous

What a charge will be ugly and traffic to dye

Anonymouse
Anonymouse

Ok wait, We had street cars in downtown? In the historic view of the building theres clearly a street car. What happened to them

Anonymous
Anonymous

America happened

Anonymous
Anonymous

Great location for a Target, Best Buy, Publix and a regular Food Court

Anonymous
Anonymous

Any chance for a place in one of the towers for the hundreds of homeless in downtown Miami?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Parking and Traffic ? …… chaos