With 10,000 Drivers, Uber Is Now One Of The Largest Employers In The Miami Area

Just ten months after launching service in Miami, Uber now has over 10,000 drivers in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

That would make it one of the largest employers in the area, ahead of long-established companies such as Publix (Uber doesn’t consider drivers to be employees, but classifies them as independent contractors, and many are part-time.)

Since launching in Miami in June 2014, Uber drivers have provided over a million rides in the tri-county area (Broward and Palm Beach were added in August 2014.) Uber’s market share of rides rose to 23% in Miami during the first quarter, according to Certify, a software company, while taxis, limos, and shuttles took the rest.

As the service has gained in popularity, it has become more efficient, with drivers now spending a higher percentage of their time with paying passengers. That has allowed Uber to cut prices in Miami twice already, with rates now said to be over 50% lower than taxi rates on some rides. Rates are now 20% lower than at launch, while driver earnings are said to have doubled.

Dade commissioners are to consider a plan next week that would legalize and regulate the service. Since the service launched, Dade has issued hundreds of tickets at over $1,000 each (Uber covers drivers for those.) Broward has also issued hundreds of citations to Uber drivers, and is also considering similar legislation to legalize the service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 Comments
most voted
newest oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Anonymous
5 years ago

Adios, shitty cab companies. Long live Uber!

William
5 years ago

Cheers to that – Modern transportation systems must include much higher utilization(s) of the existing local fleet. This will lower the total number of cars on the road.

Go Uber!!

Ed
5 years ago

Cheers to that. Although I would be okay with taxis but they need to upgrade cars, add technology, educate and train drivers. Seems like a lot to ask so perhaps this industry is coming to an end.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Isn’t that exactly what Uber is?

MrDreTheOne
5 years ago

Specially Miami Cab drivers, they are insane! The blinker light is a myth to them.

Dave
5 years ago

though technically Uber would not consider any of those drivers to be “employees”.

Ed
5 years ago

These drivers are accepting to not be “employees” and users are getting a better service at a better price then taxis so I don’t see this employee vs private contractor thing an issue. Apparently drivers don’t mind that either.

Neil
5 years ago

This piece repeatedly refers to Uber the “Employer”, which would make these 10,000+ drivers their EMPLOYEES!
Let’s see how well they do if they had to pay federal withholding taxes, social security, w/comp, unemployment, healthcare, vacations, sick days, personal days off, minimum wage, overtime, for their “employees “!
They can bribe and payoff everyone EXCEPT the U.S.
Gov’t and the DOL!
Attorneys will have a field day very soon!

Ed
5 years ago

By “this piece” I assume you’re referring to TNM piece because I just checked out Uber’s blog and they never mention “employees” but rather always use the term “driver-partners”. TNM is incorrectly reporting on Uber. As for your statement about lawyers having a field day soon, I wouldn’t be surprised and not because of drivers being considered “employees” (those are TNM’s words) but rather because in this country you can sue about anything and everything and Uber is putting pressure on what many say is a corrupt,outdated, inefficient industry (taxi industry).

Anonymous
5 years ago

you arent required to pay contractors any of that…the gov will need to go after the drivers if anything

Anonymous
5 years ago

The most threatening thing to Miami cab companies is a free market economy. For years, they have been resting on their laurels, because there was no competition. This paves the way for crap service, rude drivers, inconsistent methods (the conversion to all-credit hasn’t even been complete!).

Uber/Lyft’s civil disobedience in cities like Miami, where they are technically not operating legally, is pretty fantastic.