Work Begins On Project To Rebuild Flagler Street Into A “Great Street”

Construction began this week on a plan to turn Flagler Street into a “great street,” according to the project website.

The work has been in the planning stages for years. Some of the improvements include wider sidewalks and more shade trees.

 

Construction Begins for Flagler Reconstruction/Beautification Project

January 4th, 2016
Construction for Phase 1 commences with the closing of Flagler Street from 1st Ave. to NW Miami Ct. Signage and fencing is up and in-field mobilization begins.

 

 

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Anonymous

Just so glad Miami is growing and understand that it is. Fixing old problems and building up places that need it the most. World class city in the making!

Anonymous

While this is an improvement to Flagler street, I think the real issue is in the facade of these storefronts. Not too far away, if you look at storefronts on SE 1st street a block before Biscayne Blvd, there is a Starbucks, AT&T and others with a much nicer storefront facade. The street and sidewalks are not so much different than Flagler yet the facade makes the area look much different.

Suomynona

Hopefully this plus Mana gets that corridor to upgrade its street-level aesthetics. Hopefully.

The renderings look nice. And the “train crossing”-looking signs are an interesting touch. I do like how they want actual shade trees and not just palms (specifically discussing oaks in the renderings).

Anonymous

i hope, this time they realy do it right and use the money for the actual project…

marc

This is like the second or third time they try to renovate Flagler in the last 20 years right?

marc

Much needed but I guess no biking on that street.

Anonymous

My reaction exactly! Miami hates bike people.

Anonymous

Sadly Miami does hate bikers. Read the news. Bikers killed almost every week. Wish it wasn’t that way.

Anonymous

Would happen less if there were actual bike infrastructure. Lucky to even have a “shared lane,” which cars never actually share.

Anonymous

The bottom right corner illustration on the plan/section image shows bike lane

Alpina

It would be nice if Mana begins doing something on his sites, I want to see this street activated

Alpina

I hope they use some nice pavers instead of the red and gray ‘brick look alike’ used everywhere…. I am sick of seeing this ‘Miami Style Paver Patters’ ‘a lo Miami Style’

IloveMiami

Alpina, the ‘Miami Style’ is really ‘Brazilian Style’. The paver design visible throughout Biscayne Blvd. was the work of Brazilian landscape artist Roberto Burle Marx. Google Copacabana Beach. He did those in 1970. I think we were lucky to get the design work. The completed design, like EVERYTHING else in our cowtown, has not been fully realized. Like our Museum Park, or Bayfront Park still missing some of Isamu Noguchi’s intended sculptures. Cest la vie.

Anonymous

I was wondering when they were starting this. I love those renderings with those type of light posts and trees aligned. Beautiful.

Anonymous

This is where it all began. This is where the early history is and hopefully where the future lays.

IloveMiami

“Great Street”? Do they mean like Champs Elysees or Paseo de la Reforma? No…please say it ain’t so! Where else would all our tourist visitors go to buy the latest Rolex knock-offs, genuine-imitation Gucci handbags or vinyl suitcases to fill with souvenirs from the Miami Seaquarium, Jungle Island, Zoo Miami, Monkey Jungle, Coral Castle, and the authentic Miccosokee Village (with its totem poles) air boat rides? I bet we won’t even recognize Flagler by the time they get done with making it a “Great Street”.

KK

Ddespite being a nice homage to Henry Flagler, the rail built into the sidewalk presents potential problems for pedestrians: 1). Water and moisture trapped between the rail and the surrounding sidewalk will quicken the speed at which the rails will rust, causing the rail to gradually expand and potentially crack the sidewalk surfaces surrounding it (depending on the rate of oxidation and the gap allowed for expansion). 2). Modern, North American flanged “T” rail is not flat at the head (top) of the rail profile; it has a gradual curve dependent on weight, manufacture, and wear. This could present a potential tripping hazard (regardless of whether the highest or lowest part of the rail is level with the sidewalk). 3). In normal use, a rail head is usually polished to a shine from the motion, weight, and friction of rail wheels rolling over it. This also makes it slippery – but it will rust quickly if not in use. However, the rust layer may have more grip than the sidewalk surface. When combined with the shape of the rail head, this might grab pedestrian’s shoes without warning, further increasing trip hazards. 4). If bicycles are expected to use the sidewalk… Read more »