Worldcenter Gets Permission To Plant Trees In Public Right-Of-Way At Seventh Street Promenade

Miami Worldcenter has inked a deal to plant trees around the Seventh Street Apartments project.

The permit appears to be for the Seventh Street Promenade.

According to the permit, the following will be planted in the public right of way (excluding private property):

  • 13 southern live oaks
  • 31 sabal palms
  • 1,578 assorted shrubs and ground covers

Two other construction permits are also pending for the promenade.

A $3.7 million construction permit to install pavers was first submitted in June 2017, and was still being reworked in March 21.

A $900,000 permit to install a fountain was submitted Feb. 15 and has still not been approved.

 

 

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Anonymous
3 years ago

Sabal palms are ugly and boring looking. I like the phoenix sylvester palms better – Very pretty. But that’s just me.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Why not silver palms? They’re a Florida native (sabals are more South Carolina), look more interesting, and are currently venerable to endangerment.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Same family of palm trees.
The Sylvester and Silver palms. They are both pretty. I have them outlining my property and makes my newly renovated house look much more luxurious.

Anonymous
3 years ago

They’re not that expensive I think either.

Anonymous
3 years ago

depending on the nursery that carries them. But on average, they’re about $600 per 8 to 10 footers.

Anonymous
3 years ago

I hear you but the sabal palm is the state tree and handles dry spells pretty well.

Anonymous
3 years ago

So do Sylvester and Silver palms. You see them in the middle east and South eastern Asia.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Yup, they do survive well in dry areas. I also see them a lot in dryer states like Arizona and Nevada.

marc
3 years ago

Totally with you regarding palms. Why not go with a nicer looking palm if you’re going palm?

Anonymous
3 years ago

Phoenix Sylvester date palm is indeed beautiful. luxurious looking.

Anonymous
3 years ago

yes, or the PHOENIX DACTYLIFERA aka Medjool date palm. It is the same family as the Phoenix Sylvester date palm.
All middle eastern and south east Asian grown palms.

The Solitair building in Brickell was designed after the Medjool palm.

https://www.thenextmiami.com/first-glass-installed-zoms-48-story-solitair-brickell-photos/

Anonymous
3 years ago

Absolutely agree….they look majestic and would lend a distinctive design feature as you enter the project…. Majools are perfect choice

Anonymous
3 years ago

Medjool

Anonymous
3 years ago

Any of the Phoenix palm tree family will do just fine above and beyond the boring ugly Sabal.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Sabal palms are truly one of the ugliest and most generic palm trees. they scream Myrtle Beach, not Miami. people want to complain about Royals and Coconut palms, but when it comes hurricane time they far outperform the others. trees native to tropical hurricane prone areas are tried and true when it comes to storms. its about form AND FUNCTION. have you every looked at a Sabal palm? they always have to be propped for eternity because they can barely stand on their own. we have the ability to grow all of this wonderful vegetation other parts of the US can’t, and they choose a tree that is seen all over northern Florida and Georgia. they also do not tolerate salt water very well during storm surge. way to be exclusive. bravo morons.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Your whole point about hurricanes is just bizarre. You’re saying to use non native palms from other sub tropical/tropical regions but that a native species from a sub tropical region is unacceptable.

Weird.

Anonymous
3 years ago

are you kidding?! royal palms ARE indigenous to Florida! south Florida! as is the royal poinciana. both which perform well in hurricanes and have lived through storm after storm (without local extinction) to display their beauty long before humans arrived. sabal palms are indigenous to northern Florida! where hurricanes aren’t nearly as frequent or severe. coconut palms are not native, however have very light, small crowns and very slender trunks. they also bend to a very high degree without snapping. it is believed they harness the versatility they contain today due DIRECTLY to evolution as a result of adaption to hurricanes. THAT IS EXACTLY WHY VEGETATION THAT IS GROWN IN HIGHLY HURRICANE PRONE AREAS SHOULD BE USED. it HAS PROVEN to withstand the tests of time. not only is that a FACT but ELEMENTARY LOGIC. do your research and share supportive facts before spewing your opinion. there are plenty of guides about which types of vegetation to use for hurricane damage minimization in south Florida. READ ONE. maybe it doesn’t make SENSE to you. if so thats a personal problem only you can fix. don’t eff with me. i could school you in biodiversity any day.

suomynona
3 years ago

I was primarily talking about your ridiculous comparison between coconuts and sabals. And sabal palms are absolutely indigenous to southern Florida and parts of Cuba, Turks and Caicos and Bahamas. It’s indigenous from North Carolina to Texas, which is THE area of the United States that is most hurricane prone.

UF’s Horticulture department literally calls sabals one of the most hurricane-proof trees there can be. They even say they can grow in slightly brackish water. So storm surge in that once a decade hurricane isn’t much of a concern.

Please know wtf you’re talking about next time.

https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/sabpal/all.html#DISTRIBUTION%20AND%20OCCURRENCE

http://hort.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/sabpala.pdf

Anonymous
3 years ago

Beautiful project.
Love how Worldcenter is becoming more and more. This area will one day be very walkable. Can’t wait for the Marriott Marquis to start building. This will give the area momemtum

Anonymous
3 years ago

Yay shade trees!

Anonymous
3 years ago

Joking right? There will be a few, but mostly Palms..

Anonymous
3 years ago

To be fair, the buildings will be giving most the shade.

Anonymous
3 years ago

13 Live Oaks is nothing to laugh about. Any number is better than none.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Maybe they could use some of shade thrown on this site 😉

Anonymous
3 years ago

Exactly! Glad to see Live Oaks in the mix and not just Royal Palms, which don’t provide much shade. While I’m at it, I have to give Design District credit for the tree planted there. They are native trees (including Gumbo Limbo – my favorite) that offer shade and give the neighborhood distinctive character.

Anonymous
3 years ago

yup, numbers should be reversed. 31 live oaks and 13 palms.

Anonymous
3 years ago

13 oaks in a two block pedestrian promenade is a good amount and should provide ample shade for respite if placed properly.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Who cares?… they all better be ready when the next hurricane hits.

Anonymous
3 years ago

It looks strange with the stark exotic modern architecture, but sensible when you realize canary palms don’t give any shade whatsoever, and make the pedestrian experience like sticking your head in an oven.

Oscar
3 years ago

Might be a stupid observation but aren’t those Royal Palms in the rendering, not the Sabals they’re supposedly planting?

Anonymous
3 years ago

A little hard to tell but they look more like Sabal palm fronds than royal, to me.

Not that I think it matters. I don’t believe that’s an actual rendering of the Most up to date landscaping proposal. After all, where are the oaks on this promenade?

Anonymous
3 years ago

They are Royal palms in the rendering. But the rendering was probably done before they decided on Sabal. Anyone can change their minds on details of a project at any time. We have seen it many times here with projects.

Yet Another Anonymous
3 years ago

Yes, they totally have the green crown shaft and circular rings, and royal palms are more decorative and make more sense in these applications.

Anonymous
3 years ago

NICE!!!!

Anonymous
3 years ago

LOVE IT!, bring on the trees!

Anonymous
3 years ago

i hope they plant these in a way where the roots are not expected to raise and tear sidewalks apart because that always tends to happen.

aceraroja
3 years ago

Oaks!!! Yes. Some silver palms would be great too and they actually provide shade.

Wild that Google has already demapped 7th street.