Census: Miami Ranked #1 For International Population Growth In 2023

Miami-Dade’s net international population growth surged in 2023, and was the highest of any county in the U.S., according to new Census data.

The number of new Miami-Dade residents coming from outside the U.S. rise almost 40% last year, to 54,457.

No other county added as many new international residents.

When counting total population growth, including from domestic sources and natural change, the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL metro ranked tenth nationwide for growth, adding 43,387 residents.

Miami-Dade alone added around 14,000 net residents, with international migration being offset by domestic out-migration.

 

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anonymous
30 days ago

This is what I love about Miami. Walking around Brickell, you hear languages from all over the world. Miami is a truly cosmopolitan city.

Jonathan
29 days ago

More people moving from Latin America doesn’t make it truly cosmopolitan and nothing compared to NYC, London, etc. Miami still sucks for professionals (excluding old money successors, onlyfans, crypto-bros and real estate agents). It’s a terrible place for young families, so even those who move are just temporary expats.

Anonymous
29 days ago

Actually, Miami is where it’s at, especially for English speakers, when it comes to young professionals aiming to make their mark. It’s the perfect hub for entrepreneurs running small businesses and seeking local collaboration. Unlike cities like NYC, dominated by corporate giants, Miami offers plenty of opportunities for smaller players to excel. It’s the ultimate destination for career growth.

Anonymous
28 days ago

OMG, more about the young professionals. Do you have any other battle cry? Listen, we have our own organic residents who will not be leaving Miami in 5-10 years. I think the city needs to be geared more to them than the tourists.

Anonymous
29 days ago

In Brickell, I’ve met so many amazing humans—locals who are climbing the career ladder and newcomers from all over the world, including Europe, the Middle East, South America, Central America, Asia, Canada, and different states across the USA. It’s been an incredible mix of backgrounds and cultures!

Jem
30 days ago

Miami is growing❤️

Anonymous One
27 days ago

Miami-Dade population has seen a net decrease over said period. The reason the title of the article was so specific to call out ‘international’ only. The same people who shout Miami is growing when you hear that one billionaire bought a house here. Jesus. You all are laughable.

Anonymous
26 days ago

well, you could also consider that 200k Cubans have crossed into America from Mexico since last year and over 90% of them come to Miami Dade County ultimately. I believe its about 45% for Venezuelans too. So there are more people in Miami Dade, they might be undocumented. Also the statistics lie in terms of the NY people that live here but still have a NY residency for their corporate over lords.

Norma
30 days ago

We are growing to be a huge metropolitan city with lots of cultures and beautiful different people in it❤️

Jenny
30 days ago

I’ve been hearing more and more English in Miami, and it’s great. I am a white American and I learned how to speak Spanish in just a few years living here but I never understood how Hispanics in Miami could go on for decades without learning a word of English. It’s about time things are changing!

Anonymous
30 days ago

Same here! Nobody should speak just one language in the globalized world that we live in, whether that be English or Spanish, and certainly not in a country with such vast educational resources like we have here.

Anonymous
30 days ago

In Miami, it appears that everyone can speak English, except perhaps some janitors. If they don’t, it could be due to protectionism or a false sense of superiority, clinging to an outdated notion of ownership when they’re actually just renting there.

Anonymous
30 days ago

You realllly need to visit other parts of Miami-Dade. In many parts of the county, you will simply not hear English and many people working regular middle-class jobs there — far beyond just janitors — do not have even an intermediate level of English.

Anonymous
30 days ago

They’re likely in the service industry if they can’t speak English, nothing wrong with that but they’re not middle class professionals. I’ve never had to speak Spanish anywhere in Miami Dade, at least the nice parts where I go.

Anonymous
30 days ago

That’s not true. I’ve been all over Miami-dade and all the professionals and even service workers speak English, now whether they chose to do so is another story.

Raul
30 days ago

Jenny,
My God don’t be so stupid, many of these Hispanics (such as my parents from Cuba) arrived with nothing but a dream for a better life for their children and went straight to work. The idea that people who arrive in this country work 6-7 days a week 12 hours a day barely surviving to feed their children go to night school and learn English is beyond stupid lol. Little Italy in New York, Little Germany in Manhatten known in German as Kleindeutschland and Deutschländle experienced the same when they arrived. Use your brain, second generation dominate the English language and become professionals such as myself in this beautiful country.

Anonymous
29 days ago

But honestly, it’s not that hard to learn a new language over the course of many years. Especially English, which is, objectively, the easiest language to learn as a second language. Of course nobody expects them to learn immediately.

Anonymous
29 days ago

Raul is correct; other immigrant communities, like Italians and Arabs, initially struggled with English, but by the second generation, they become fluent. Multiculturalism is one of my favorite aspects of American cities like Miami, and a shared English language doesn’t threaten it. I understand Hispanic concerns about preserving their culture. Many Italian and Arab Americans, who assimilated over generations, have lost their native languages. However, language serves to connect us, regardless of our origins. It’s not the culture itself, but rather the means to share it. The greatness of the USA lies in embracing cultural diversity, uniting around common values and language, ensuring all people feel appreciated and welcomed.

Anon
29 days ago

Why? You’ve moved to Miami, you knew what Miami was like. I hope the City’s unique culture and footprint doesn’t change and get washed out.

Anonymous
29 days ago

You can say the same about America. Miami is a part of America, isn’t it? People moved to the United States of America knowing the de facto official language is English.

Anonymous
27 days ago

It is interesting to see people from the North East preach so much about cultural acceptance, but the second they have to conform to a new city they start squawking about how America is a melting pot and the local population isn’t as evolved as they are and they need to change to better reflect the “growing young professional community”

Cover the Podiums
30 days ago

Umm it’s most likely rich South Americans lol

Anonymous Four
27 days ago

Miami has seen negative population growth. Stop with the twists.

Name*
30 days ago

Big middle and lower class domestic outmigration being overlooked.

Anonymous
30 days ago

Middle class is coming in, it’s just lower welfare class moving out of state.

Cover the Podiums
30 days ago

Nope. The really poor stay in the section 8 apartment. The middle class is moving out bc they save money

Anonymous
29 days ago

This will be temporary. Real initiatives are being undertaken now to encourage the construction of affordable housing and workforce housing. And this is happening throughout the three county Miami metropolitan area. Previously there was too much emphasis on high-end luxury condos and apartment construction, especially in downtown Miami and very little effort to address the affordable housing crisis. The super-luxury market is just as active as ever but it will soon be more balanced by the less sexy but vitally necessary lower cost alternatives. This is mainly because those who are working construction trades and doing the hands-on work in the luxury market need to have a place to live as well. Absent that and the extraordinarily profitable high-end market disappears because the workers who are needed cannot afford to live where they work. The marketplace always adjusts and rebalances to supply the demand and that is finally starting to happen now.

Anonymous
29 days ago

We need major upzoning throughout Little Havana if we wanna make it possible for middle income people. There isn’t enough space.

Anonymous
29 days ago

I’d like to see a shift towards buildings with 4-6 floors for mixed-use purposes, particularly west of I-95 along the riverfront. This move could help create community centers similar to CityPlace in Doral or West Palm Beach. The idea is to keep the charm of low-rise buildings while making it financially appealing for developers to improve the area. It would also be wise to protect a few historical buildings, similar to what was done with the Harriet Himmel Theater in the Square, to maintain the area’s heritage.

Anonymous
28 days ago

Dude, why do you keep saying your arbitrary take to limit it to 4-6 floors? Historic preservation? That is the perfect CA/NY way of thwarting growth permanently. what is the charm of the low-rise building? What’s wrong with a 6-10 floor buildings? Stop trying to create a Brooklyn equivalent. We need housing in the urban corridor of Miami NOW! This all stems from the 2015 upzoning proposal that was shut down 2017. They were using the same reasoning to stop the LH upzoining then and look what kind of a mess we are in with housing prices through the roof and no new buildings west of I95. BTW most of the “developers” west of I95 are just mom-and-pop property owners.

Anonymous
29 days ago

Who said affordable can’t be sexy and attractive? The key is finding a way to make things balanced, not subtract quality.

Anonymous
28 days ago

people who say have their hearts in the right place – but are fully misguided. The need for mid-level and lower-level housing supply is much greater than the need to get everything just right – making everything perfectly fit in terms of walkability, architecture, interconnectivity, ect. These are sadly becoming forms of obstructionism. We have a population bubble in the Millenails and Gen Z. If you miss that growth window Miami and the US will have major issues – much worse than making things imbalanced in certain neighborhoods.

Anonymous
30 days ago

Meanwhile the middle class/locals are being eradicated

Anonymous
30 days ago

Not true. Step outside of Brickell sometime and you’ll see Miami is FULL of middle class residents.

Cesar
29 days ago

Yeah, but with rising insurance costs, how much longer can they all stay? A lot of folks don’t realize that longtime residents and homeowners are being forced out because of rising insurance. Heck, my parents had to sell because their homeowners, wind, and flood insurance became more expensive than what their mortgage was before they paid it off.

Anonymous
29 days ago

it’s worse than that, the children of long time residents can’t buy a middle class housing because there is none, because the real estate is so expensive. Long time residents have kids, we want the kids to stay – otherwise its a brain drain and we end up with a migrant upper class and no middle class.

Anonymous
29 days ago

That’s all because of the state legislatures and governor, passing a law after Surfside without a plan of how to pay for it. The state really should have provide a temporary bail out to HOA owners before enacting such a drastic policy change.

Cesar
29 days ago

So you want the government to subsidize HOAs for their failure to properly maintain their private property? GTFO.

Cesar
29 days ago

Also, insurance rates are going up because of climate change, not because of laws passed in Tallahassee. Florida’s insurance crisis is following the same path as California’s. Instead of wild fires, it’s hurricanes, though.

Anonymous
28 days ago

Hurricanes haven’t been as bad as youre saying in south florida. The last one hit north florida in the panhandle.

Sgt. Sapingo
29 days ago

Brickell isn’t middle class?

Norma Jem
30 days ago

“throughout history, there have been many cultures miami is growing fast <3

Jordan
30 days ago

Not true.
In the 1500’s there were mostly Tequesta Indians. Not “many cultures” just Tequesta Indians.

But they are rumored to have been able to navigate the sidewalks without complaint, and never NEEDED a Metromover extension.

Anonymous
30 days ago

I doubt the Tequesta let their sidewalks fall into disrepair. They were a sophisticated tribe.

ParkingHater
30 days ago

Cool, let’s build more housing so we can accept even more

Anon
30 days ago

But we’ve lost domestic residents

Anonymous
30 days ago

Those “domestic” residents were mostly transient to begin with, don’t blame people putting down roots with aims of contributing to the community from all backgrounds.

Data Dude
29 days ago

The trend of negative net domestic migration for Miami-Dade County is not new. This has been happening for at least 5 years now, maybe even closer to 8 or 10. If you keep up with Census Data releases, you’ll see it’s been a trend. Folks who left over 5 years ago were not the “transient” people we think of today (people who came here to escape covid lockdowns or high taxes).

Antennae
30 days ago

It would have been nice to see a breakdown by country of all the international migration.

Data Dude
30 days ago

This comes from the Census’s annual population estimates product, which estimates population growth through births, deaths, and net migration (both domestic and international. The Census’s American Community Survey (ACS) is where you’ll get estimates of where folks are migrating from by county (domestic) and country (international).

guy1
30 days ago

and water is wet…

No road, No rail, No future
30 days ago

Yeah, because later they can’t leave because the elevators and escalators are all broken at MIA.

Name*
30 days ago

<3 = bot

Anonymous
30 days ago

If actual populations were recorded, New Yuck and Commiefornia would top the list with illegals.

Anonymous
29 days ago

Don’t forget Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and other bright red states with HUGE farm worker populations, most of whom are undocumented.

??…?
29 days ago

Why do you have such a problem with immigrants? They’re the ones doing the jobs that lazy Americans won’t do, like farm work and construction.

Anonymous
30 days ago

This is why service sucks in miami, and streets are flooded with motor bikes, the streets are dirty, everyone listens to the news, music and calls on speaker, etc, etc, etc

Nancy
30 days ago

Streets are dirty?! They are the cleanest I’ve ever seen in any major city. Music on speaker is great, this is a fun city not a boring one. But yes, too much traffic for sure, we deserve a subway system or we will all
be stuck in our cars forever.

Anonymous
30 days ago

Since a more diverse young professional population has begun to call Miami home, the city has undergone a remarkable transformation. 🌆 Once perceived as an undervalued slum overrun by wealthy gangsters exploiting the disadvantaged, Miami has evolved into a vibrant melting pot of cultures, attracting a burgeoning middle class and wealthier residents. 🎨🏙️ This shift has turned Miami into an arts-rich, family-friendly urban center, making it an increasingly desirable place for diverse young professionals to live and work. 💼👩‍💼

Anonymous
30 days ago

Melting pot implies cultural diffusion.

DWNTWNR
29 days ago

Have you walked around downtown? Every square inch smells like human feces or vomit. As a dog owner, trust me, there’s a difference between the smell of human and dog feces.

Anonymous
28 days ago

NE people moving to Miami and creating a political enclave in the center of the city… then taking over the political machine of the city to set things back on the “right path” which is actually far to the Left of the rest of the city.

DWNTNWR
28 days ago

So either you’re hard of smell or don’t live or work in downtown. Got it. Miami was the first city in the nation to make a poop map. Years before San Francisco. This wasn’t political until you made it political.

Anonymous
27 days ago

I smell something every time you open your mouth on this discussion board.

Debbie
30 days ago

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